Taxi Services in Memphis

A/B Testing and Eye Tracking

UI/UX | A/B Testing | Research

Fall 2017

for the full report, click HERE

Goal

To investigate usability of two different versions of a taxi service information website in Memphis for first time users.

Taxi services that are available vary by every city. In this study, I investigated the difference in click through rate, time to click, dwell time and return rate for A and B versions of a site that informs different taxi services available in Memphis to determine the more effective website with better user experience.

To start, 2 different versions of Memphis Taxi services were created for A/B testing, which can be found HERE.

Version A

Higher time to click

Version B

Higher click through rate

Higher average dwell time

A & B had the same return rate

Eye Tracking
 
Hypothesis

Version B will generate more visual interest below the header than Version A due to the increased amount of images and content on the webpage.

Version A
  • eye lingers on and scans the text on equal intervals

  • skims through without thoroughly reading the descriptions.

  • total of 16 seconds spent on the website before user clicked

Version B
  • the eye lingers mainly on the images

  • gaze frequently returns to images

  • total of 36 seconds spent on the website before user clicked

This serves as evidence to the given hypothesis, where the eye lingered more on the images, the source of visual interest, and the user dwelled longer on the website on version B.

Conclusion
 

I believe that Memphis Taxi Co. should conduct more tests after redesigning version B. Click through rate was higher, time to click was shorter, average dwell time was longer, and more visual interest was shown for version B. However, the results of this experiment did not yield adequate data to reject null hypotheses nor did the rate of return differ from that of A. I recommend adding more visuals to maximize interest, make the link buttons stand out more than they do on the page, possibly reduce the amount of text to the minimum and re-conduct both the AB and eye tracking tests with the updated design.

The results from A/B testing are interesting in comparison with the eye tracking, where it took the subject looking at B a longer time for time to click. However, it is important to keep in mind that these two tests were designed to provide different information. A/B test for solid numerical data that focuses on action through the interface while eye tracking shows us how the user navigates a single page of the interface. The results of the eye tracking test could provide an explanation of the A/B tests, or other supplemental information. Both are useful in their own ways, but I believe to evaluate an interface or a product, both have to be taken into consideration.

These tests together will cost Memphis Taxi Co. a good amount of time and resources in the short run but a stronger design and better usability from these tests will benefit the company in the long run.